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English

The English Department offers courses to meet the needs of students at all academic levels. From English 9 to English Literature 12, the courses students study will help them to develop strong reading, writing, listening, speaking, and critical thinking skills.

English 9 through 12 offer opportunities for students to develop communications skills, acquire required knowledge, and demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways. Honours 9 extension activities, English 10 Honours, and Literature 12 are options for students who have an additional love of literature.

English as a Second Language (ESL) students will be assessed in their language proficiency to determine the course which best suits their abilities.

Based on their performance and assessed abilities, students may also be recommended by teachers and counsellors to Adapted and Communications courses. All recommendations will be made on an individual basis to ensure the programming that will help students to be successful.

English 9 (EN9)
Prerequisite: EN8
The focus is on developing a strong base of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Students are also encouraged to develop critical thinking skills as well as an increased appreciation of literature. Please Note: English 9 is an integrated class; there is no specifically designated English 9 Honours class. Students may, however, achieve an honours standing within the context of the integrated class. Students will have the option of choosing challenge activities and reading materials that go beyond the demands of the regular curriculum. If they do so, and achieve a high level of performance in both their regular work and in their challenge activities, they will receive the honours designation on their report card. Honours standing must be earned each term. At the end of the semester there is a final examination worth 20% of the overall course mark for all English 9 students.

English 10 (EN10)
Prerequisite: EN9
The focus on developing a strong base of reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. Students are also encouraged to develop critical thinking skills as well as an increased appreciation of literature. Essays, novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various times, places and authors are studied to provide students with an opportunity to read good literature and to develop their comprehension, writing, and discussion and analytical skills. Emphasis is placed on students sharing insights gained from reading and discussion, and on an understanding of different human values. Emphasis is on the writing process. There is a provincial exam at the end of this course that is worth 20% of the final mark.

English 10 Honours (EN10H)
Prerequisite: 86% or above in EN9 and teacher’s recommendation/portfolio of grade 9 work
This course covers the ‘core’ curriculum organizers of English/Language Arts 10 including novel study, poetry, short stories, creative writing and drama. It provides students with an opportunity to study significant literary works such as The Wave by Todd Strasser, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Animal Farm by George Orwell and Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare. It also provides students with ample opportunities to express their views, make decisions, feel that their ideas are valued, and assume increasing responsibility for their learning. Students are presented with a window into the past, a complex portrayal of the present, and questions about the future. Class participation is a key element for success in this course. Supplementary reading will be required. Students should be prepared to go well beyond the requirements of the regular English 10 curriculum. This course encourages students to: 1. Communicate effectively in written, spoken, and visual forms, 2. Develop positive attitudes toward language learning, 3. Make connections to other areas of study and to life outside the classroom, 4. Think critically, creatively, and reflectively, 5. Appreciate their own culture and the culture of others, 6. Use technology. There is a provincial exam at the end of this course that is worth 20% of the final mark.

Communications 11 (COM11)
 Prerequisite: EN10 and teacher’s recommendation
This course is designed to meet the needs of students who do not plan to go directly to university as well as students who have had a history of difficulty in English courses. Follows a sequence of development from basic to advanced skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Literature, which forms approximately one-third of the course, will be interwoven into the course. Students who have weak English skills will be asked to choose Communications 11 rather than English 11. Because spaces in Communications 11 are limited, transfers into this course from English 11 may NOT be possible once the semester has begun. Students are advised to follow their English teachers' recommendations. There is a final exam worth 20% of the overall grade.

English 11 (EN11)
Prerequisite: EN10
Emphasizes the development of more mature reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The course is divided into two main areas: literature and composition. Essays, novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various times, places and authors are studied to provide students with an opportunity to read good literature and to develop their comprehension, writing, and discussion and analytical skills. Emphasis is placed on students sharing insights gained from reading and discussion, and on an understanding of different human values. Emphasis is on the writing process. There is a final exam worth 20% of the overall grade.

Communications 12 (COM12)
Prerequisite: COM11 or teacher’s recommendation
Students will write a provincial exam worth 40% of their overall mark in January or June. This exam will differ in content from the regular English 12 exam. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who do not plan to go directly to university as well as students who have had a history of difficulty in English courses. It follows a sequence of development from basic to advanced skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing. Literature, which formsapproximately one-third of the course, will be interwoven into the course. Students who have weak English skills will be asked to choose Communications 12 rather than English 12. Because spaces in Communications 12 are limited, transfers into this course from English 12 may NOT be possible once the semester has begun. Students are advised to follow their English teachers' recommendations.

English 12 (EN12)
Prerequisite: EN11
Re-emphasizes the more mature development of reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills. There is also a more sophisticated approach to the study of literature.  Novels, plays, essays, poems, and short stories are studied both intensively and extensively for the following reasons: 1. Students learn to appreciate literature as a means to understanding themselves and society. Students identify and discuss values, attitudes, behavior, and the human condition in general. 2. Students study a variety of literary forms from different times, places, and authors so that they may gain an appreciation for the scope of the literary heritage that is theirs. 3. Students develop skills in analysis, criticism and evaluation by exploring theme, point of view, and character development. 4. Encouragement is given to read for enjoyment and for information. The emphasis is on the writing process. Students also complete an important literary research essay project. Students are challenged to progress toward more sophisticated writing styles. Students must write a provincial final examination worth 40% of their overall grade.

English Literature 12 (LIT12)
Recommended: 70% in EN11
This is a lively course which covers literature including the action packed epic poem Beowulf, the classic medieval romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the enlightening Canterbury Tales, pastoral poetry, sonnets, Shakespeare's The Tempest, Milton's amazing Paradise Lost, the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century, the Romantic Age, the Victorian Age, and writers from the twentieth century. The course also examines important historical events of the various time periods which impacted the works of the authors. Sound recordings and videos are used to help students understand concepts. Class participation is a key element for success in this course. Students are provided with a comprehensive workbook to enhance understanding and stimulate discussion. This course is a must for those considering the Humanities at the post-secondary level. It is also wonderfully entertaining and enjoyable for those who just love literature. May be used to meet university entrance requirements to a number of programs.